FLY8MA Flight Training https://fly8ma.com The World's Best FREE Online Pilot Ground School Sun, 30 Aug 2020 19:28:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://fly8ma.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/FLY8ma-80x80.png FLY8MA Flight Training https://fly8ma.com 32 32 sUAS Near Miss https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/08/17/suas-near-miss/ https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/08/17/suas-near-miss/#respond Mon, 17 Aug 2020 13:00:41 +0000 https://fly8ma.com/?p=73720 On May 12th, at approximately 11:47 AM, the Blue Angels were performing a formation flyover in Detroit to honor first responders and medical staff battling COVID-19. The flyover was appropriately titled the “Detroit America Strong Flyover”. In the total time of four minutes that the Blue Angels were operating over the city of Detroit, an […]

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On May 12th, at approximately 11:47 AM, the Blue Angels were performing a formation flyover in Detroit to honor first responders and medical staff battling COVID-19. The flyover was appropriately titled the “Detroit America Strong Flyover”.

In the total time of four minutes that the Blue Angels were operating over the city of Detroit, an individual in the area decided he wanted to grab some footage of the flyover with his DJI drone.

Although all of the footage found in the originally released video could be considered reckless endangerment, there was one shot in particular that left both the pilot and drone community outraged.

As the F/A-18 Hornet located on the far right of the image above crosses the frame, it misses the drone by mere feet.

Not surprisingly, the original Instagram account which uploaded the footage was deleted shortly after the video went viral.

This is not the first time a near-miss incident has occurred (that has found it’s way onto the internet) within recent years:

There were at least three rules broken by the operator of the flight above. The first being that the drone operator likely exceed the 400’ AGL altitude limit; a guideline prior to 2018 but now a hard limit. Secondly, operating a drone in a careless or reckless manner, and third, not giving way to manned aircraft.

We could write on explaining how reckless and dangerous the decisions made by this operator were, and how he put the lives of multiple parties (both the pilots in tight formation and any bystanders below) at risk. But we imagine that you as a reader of FLY8MA.com, a website for both manned and unmanned aviation education, most likely understand that the actions taken by this individual were reckless. Therefore, let’s focus on the more universal issue at hand; these events keep happening.

In a press release by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) on May 21st of this year, researchers stated that their findings of a 30-day monitoring period near Daytona Beach International Airport in Florida, using a DJI AeroScope system capable of detecting and locating nearby DJI drones. “The vast majority of small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) detected around Daytona Beach International Airport during a 30-day period in 2019 lacked approval from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and more than one-third of those drones were flying higher than the law allows”.

Members of the public are, knowingly or unknowingly, operating small unmanned aerial systems outside of regulatory boundaries. While this certainly is concerning, the question remains: what’s the damage?

In recent years, the FAA has had more than 100 documented cases of recreational drone operations in or around wildfires. There are temporary flight restrictions (TFRs) in place to allow fire suppression aircraft to operate safely. When drones are operating recreationally in or near a wildfire, fire suppression aircraft can’t. This jeopardizes both efforts to contain the fire and potentially puts ground crews at risk.

Furthermore, within the US and Canada, we have had three confirmed drone strikes in recent years, spanning a wide category of aircraft. On September 21st, 2017, a U.S. Army Sikorsky Blackhawk was operating approximately 21 miles east of Staten Island, NY when the main rotor made contact with a DJI Phantom 4; creating a 1 and ½ inch dent on one of the blades, cracking the composite fairing and a portion of the window frame, and lodging several components of the drone into the helicopter. The drone operator was flying in an active TFR (temporary flight restriction zone). Only a month later, a Beech King Air A100 operated by SkyJet Aviation collided with a sUAS on approach to land at Jean Lesage Airport near Quebec, Canada. The drone was operating at 1,500 feet; over three times the altitude limit for recreational sUAS operations. On August 10th, 2018, an operator lost sight of a hot air balloon on his monitor and collided with the balloon. The drone operator had been flying the sUAS within five miles of an airport without notifying air traffic control.   In all three incidents, regulations were broken; ultimately leading to the accident. Fortunately, no incidents led to loss of life. More incidents have been reported but are unconfirmed.

The message is clear. While those operating drones professionally have the knowledge of how to safely operate in areas near manned aircraft, a majority of the general public does not. We therefore need to have a greater emphasis on educating the general public in regard to safe drone operation before a fatal collision occurs.

Education will reduce the risk of a midair collision, and therefore reduce the implications that would be caused by such an accident if it were fatal; such as further limiting or restricting sUAS purchase access or flight areas.

Let’s work together to increase flight safety in the national airspace system. If you or someone you know is interested in flying a drone, refer them to the Federal Aviation Administration’s “Know before you fly” website (http://knowbeforeyoufly.org/) and let them know that FLY8MA has a course if they are interested in obtaining their Part 107 sUAS certificate!

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Avoiding Midair Collisions https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/08/06/avoiding-midair-collisions/ https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/08/06/avoiding-midair-collisions/#respond Thu, 06 Aug 2020 23:06:01 +0000 https://fly8ma.com/?p=73733 Photo Credit: Loren Holmes / Anchorage Daily News Avoiding Midair Collisions It seems to happen every Summer. Seven people were killed Friday when a beaver and cub had a midair collision near Soldotna, Alaska. On May 13th of last year, a Beaver and Otter collided near George Inlet, Alaska; killing 6 and injuring 10. In […]

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Photo Credit: Loren Holmes / Anchorage Daily News

Avoiding Midair Collisions

It seems to happen every Summer. Seven people were killed Friday when a beaver and cub had a midair collision near Soldotna, Alaska. On May 13th of last year, a Beaver and Otter collided near George Inlet, Alaska; killing 6 and injuring 10. In 2018? Four were killed on a training flight in Sweetwater, FL when a Piper PA-31 and Cessna 172 collided.

As we move into the age of modern cockpit avionics and onboard traffic collision avoidance systems, one would think that the number of midair collisions would be declining among other general aviation accident trends.

So why is it that the number of midair collisions, reported annually, has rarely changed over the last 18 years?

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, mid-air collisions remain on the top 10 list as being a leading cause of general aviation accidents resulting in fatalities.

Having a good visual scan and minimizing “heads down” time is important to maintain traffic separation. But even so, this only guards against a mere five percent of mid-air collisions. According to AOPA’s Air Safety Institute, eighty-two percent of midair collisions happen from the rear of the aircraft. So how do we mitigate the risk of a midair if we can’t even see other traffic?

  • Fly at the proper VFR altitudes. Remember, when flying at VFR altitudes above 3,000′ AGL; between zero to 179 degrees, fly odd thousands plus five hundred (ex: 5,500 MSL), and between 180 to 359 degrees, fly even thousands plus five hundred (ex: 4,500′ MSL).
  • Before entering a turn in a high-wing aircraft, lift the wing and ensure there is no potential traffic conflict.
  • When performing clearing turns, do your first turn to the left. If someone is in the process of overtaking you from behind, the proper action is to overtake on the right. Turning to the left will mitigate the possibility of a midair should someone be attempting to overtake you.
  • Equip your aircraft with ADS-B in & out.
  • Use flight following and enlist the help of your passengers. It’s always good to have another pair of eyes watching out for traffic.

 

While many think that mid-airs are most likely to occur en-route, such as when on an airway or crossing a VOR, nearly half of midair collisions actually occur in the traffic pattern, with a majority of those being at non-towered airports where traffic separation is not provided. The most common location of impact is on final or over the runway.

So what can we do in an uncontrolled airport environment to prevent collisions from occurring?

  • Be familiar with and use VFR waypoints (reporting points) for position reports.
  • Be familiar with your aircraft blind spots (either high wing or low wing) and use recommended techniques to mitigate them.
  • Tune and verify you are on the correct frequency, at minimum, ten miles from the airport. If on with approach control, use your second radio to monitor traffic in the area.
  • Report your position and intentions when 10 miles out from the airport. Listen for other traffic reports and report entering downwind, turning base, and turning final.
  • Identify the airport at the beginning and end of every transmission.
  • If you begin to wonder about the location of another aircraft, just ask.
  • Be aware of NORDO (No radio) traffic operating in the area or in the pattern.
  • Check behind you and below you when on final to ensure no other traffic.
  • When outbound, report your position, and be aware that many others don’t do this.
  • Report distance in miles rather than navigational fixes. (Both VFR and IFR)

 

In addition to non-towered operations, runway incursions are becoming a growing issue at towered airports; Hence the FAA’s emphasis area on runway incursions in nearly every ACS and PTS. Runway incursions commonly happen either due to complacency or unfamiliarity with the airfield.

We can practice a few techniques to assist in avoiding runway incursions:

  • Listen carefully and intently to taxi instructions and read them back. It is easy to become complacent and take an incorrect turn if the taxi route differs from what you are used to.
  • Review the airport taxi diagram prior to departing or arriving.
  • If unsure, ask for a progressive taxi.
  • Before entering the runway (either for departure or to cross), ensure there is no traffic on final.
  • Pay close attention at airports with parallel runways.

 

We can all do our part to mitigate and improve general aviation’s safety record in regard to midairs. If you are a student pilot, ensure you are working in the techniques above; and if you are an instructor, make sure to teach them to your student!

If you’d like to learn more about runway incursion procedures, you can check out our “Runway Incursion Avoidance” audio lecture in our CFI PTS: Explained in Detail course, accessible here!

 

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Ready for your IFR Checkride? https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/07/16/ready-for-your-ifr-checkride/ https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/07/16/ready-for-your-ifr-checkride/#respond Thu, 16 Jul 2020 21:48:32 +0000 https://fly8ma.com/?p=73641   Are you ready for your IFR Checkride? Check out our latest IFR Oral Exam video below and test your instrument knowledge against our IFR Checkride Quiz!   To view all of our full length IFR Oral Exam videos, click here to be taken to our Instrument Course.   Are you ready? Read through the […]

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Are you ready for your IFR Checkride? Check out our latest IFR Oral Exam video below and test your instrument knowledge against our IFR Checkride Quiz!

 

To view all of our full length IFR Oral Exam videos, click here to be taken to our Instrument Course.

 

Are you ready? Read through the questions below and click the bubble you believe to be the correct answer! We’ll give you feedback as you go and give you an explanation of the correct answer. 

 

When can you legally log instrument approaches for currency?

The correct answer is "When IMC conditions prevail until passing the FAF, or upon reaching DH/MDA when under the hood". The other answers are incorrect as they do not require the pilot to fly all segments of the approach (except for the missed approach), which is required in order to log the approach for currency.

You are instructed to enter a hold at 8,000′ MSL. What is your maximum holding speed?

The correct answer is "230 KIAS". Maximum holding speeds are as follows: At or below 14,000' MSL: 230 KIAS Above 14,000' MSL to 20,000' MSL: 240 KIAS 20,000' MSL to 34,000' MSL: 265 KIAS

On a standard six pack, which instrument(s) are gyroscopically driven?

The correct answer is "Attitude Indicator, Heading Indicator, and Turn Coordinator". All three instruments are gyroscopically driven. The gyro for the turn coordinator is powered electrically, as compared to the Attitude and Heading Indicator which are powered by the aircraft's vacuum pump to promote redundancy.

As you begin your descent, you notice your altimeter and vertical speed indicators are not changing. From this you may conclude that:

The correct answer is "Your static port has frozen over, and your actual airspeed will be lower than indicated". As you begin your descent with a frozen static port, your airspeed indicator cannot correct for the trapped static pressure. Therefore, as you descend and more ram air is pushed through the pitot tube, your actual airspeed will be lower than that indicated.

For an instrument airplane, the following inspections are required every 24 calendar months:

The correct answer is "ELT, Transponder, Mode C Altitude Encoder, and Static System". Per 91.413, an inspection of a Transponder is required every 24 calendar months. In addition to this, airplanes operated under Instrument flight must have both the Mode C Altitude Encoder and Static system checked as per FAR 91.411.

A Mode C Altitude Encoder reports the aircraft’s:

The correct answer is "Pressure Altitude". A mode C capable Transponder with an Altitude Encoder does not rely on, nor is it connected to, your altimeter. Software built into ATC's radar system converts the pressure altitude reported by the aircraft by applying the local altimeter setting. This reduces the possibility of a midair due to a faulty or incorrectly calibrated altimeter, or an incorrect barometric pressure setting.
You scored  %

 

How’d you do? Whether you are looking to start Instrument Ground School and receive the written endorsement, or If you are looking to sharpen your knowledge prior to the checkride, check out our 2020 IFR Instrument Pilot Course! Accessible with our First Officer or Captain membership. 

Our course includes comprehensive preparation covering everything you need to know for your written exam, flight training, and checkride. Our Learning Management System allows you to track your training step-by-step as you progress through 15 lessons broken down into easy to digest sub-topics. Our course is real-world focused, and incorporates 20 case study examples allowing you to build a solid and safe foundation on instrument flying. Click here to get started!

 

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Cessna 172 Crash in Canyon https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/06/28/cessna-172-crash-in-canyon/ https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/06/28/cessna-172-crash-in-canyon/#respond Sun, 28 Jun 2020 08:41:44 +0000 https://fly8ma.com/?p=73523 They entered and flew below the canyon walls. Although the Private Pilot had flown through this canyon once before; it was with a flight instructor,  in the opposite direction of travel, and in a slower airplane. Approximately two miles into the canyon, they encountered a tight turn, which the pilot was not able to successfully navigate.  The aircraft impacted terrain about 500 ft above the river, and 200 ft below the canyon wall. 

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Accident Case Study

cessna crash in canyon

The Incident 

On September 22nd, 2017, the newly certificated Private Pilot told family members he was planning to take a friend up around the traffic pattern and perform some touch and go’s. Contrary to that stated plan, the pilot opted instead to depart the pattern toward a meandering river canyon just northeast of the airport. 

They entered and flew below the canyon walls. Although the Private Pilot had flown through this canyon once before; it was with a flight instructor,  in the opposite direction of travel, and in a slower airplane. Approximately two miles into the canyon, they encountered a tight turn, which the pilot was not able to successfully navigate.  The aircraft impacted terrain about 500 ft above the river, and 200 ft below the canyon wall. 

fatal crash in cessna

Wreckage debris indicated a low-energy impact, with the airplane most likely in the incipient phase of a spin. The accident was fatal for both pilot and passenger, with a majority of the wreckage being consumed in a post-impact fire. 

It’s unknown why the pilot deviated from his original stated plan. One reason could be that the aircraft would soon need to be refueled, and the canyon exited in the direction of the airport where the pilot typically purchased fuel; the other possibility being that having his friend onboard influenced his route to make the flight more exciting.

NTSB Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determined the probable causes of this accident to be the pilot’s decision to fly into a canyon during wind conditions conducive to turbulence and downdrafts, and his subsequent loss of aircraft control while maneuvering in the canyon. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s limited canyon flying experience.

Background Info

Location: Near Ernest A. Love Field Airport (KPRC) in Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona

Aircraft: 1972 Cessna 172L

Pilot: 

  • 19 Years Old
  • 120 Total, 60 PIC
  • Held Private Pilot Certificate with no additional ratings or endorsements. 

Weather:

  • Clear, visibility greater than 10 miles. 
  • Temperature 19 C (66.2 F) 
  • Winds out of the south at 15, gusting 22 knots. 

c172 plane crash site

How could this accident have been avoided?

Lack of mountain flying experience was the biggest factor in this incident. The pilot’s inexperience in regard to total flight time, unfamiliarity with the canyon, and lack of experience in the flying techniques required to successfully navigate the canyon, built the chain of events leading to this accident.  GET THOROUGH MOUNTAIN FLYING TRAINING FROM A QUALIFIED CFI BEFORE FLYING IN OR NEAR MOUNTAINS.

Weather was the secondary factor. Prevailing winds created a tailwind, and produced downdrafts and turbulence within the canyon. NTSB performance calculations revealed that the turn with the prevailing conditions was theoretically possible, but that it would have required precision flying, which once again, ultimately, comes with experience.

Hazardous Attitudes were potentially involved, as well. Although we do not have enough information to conclude that “macho” (trying to prove themselves by taking risk to impress others), or “invulnerability” (it won’t happen to me) attitudes were in play, it is very likely that “impulsivity” (making a quick decision on the go, not fully considering the lack of important information) was, as the flight that took place deviated from the original plan. There is a high likelihood that the pilot made a quick decision to deviate from the original plan, therefore not taking into account all of the additional variables that needed to be addressed prior to entering the canyon. 

In closing, with the prevailing winds, the pilots limited canyon flying experience, and only around 120 hours total time; the pilot shouldn’t have entered the canyon on this day. There were multiple factors that should have been considered that ultimately led to the crash; as with any accident. 

We write these articles not to criticize the actions of our fellow aviator, but instead with the objective of sharing the chain of events leading up to the incident in an effort to allow you to break the chain of events before the incident occurs, if you find yourself in a similar situation.  If you’re starting to think of turning around and using a safer route, that would be a good time to do it.

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FAA temporarily suspends medical certificate enforcement https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/03/29/faa-temporarily-suspends-medical-certificate-enforcement/ https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/03/29/faa-temporarily-suspends-medical-certificate-enforcement/#respond Sun, 29 Mar 2020 22:31:05 +0000 https://fly8ma.com/?p=72704 The Federal Aviation Administration issued a notice on Friday stating that they will not be enforcing medical certificate currency for pilots whose medical expires after March 30th. Pilot medicals of any class that expire after this date can be used until June 30th, with no enforcement action or penalty. The FAA stated that it made […]

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The Federal Aviation Administration issued a notice on Friday stating that they will not be enforcing medical certificate currency for pilots whose medical expires after March 30th.

Pilot medicals of any class that expire after this date can be used until June 30th, with no enforcement action or penalty. The FAA stated that it made this decision in order to allow medical professionals that act as designated aviation medical examiners to focus their efforts on the COVID19 pandemic.

This enforcement change came after the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, among many other general and commercial aviation associations, called upon the FAA to relax deadlines for time critical pilot certification tasks, including check rides and knowledge tests.

“The FAA is meeting the moment by finding the quickest and most effective path to address an urgent need, and we deeply appreciate the creative thinking and recognition that keeping general aviation operational serves a greater good,” said AOPA President Mark Baker.

Ryan Waguespack, Senior Vice President the National Air Transportation Association also commented on the notice, stating that the move was necessary to keep Part 135 carriers operating. “NATA is grateful the FAA is continuing to listen to our requests to support the 135 industry during this critical time.”

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How to schedule your FAA Written Exam https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/03/25/how-to-schedule-your-faa-written-exam/ https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/03/25/how-to-schedule-your-faa-written-exam/#respond Wed, 25 Mar 2020 18:20:51 +0000 https://fly8ma.com/?p=72642 The Federal Aviation Administration recently rolled out a new system to schedule FAA knowledge tests. Check out our new YouTube video above to learn how to obtain your FTN number and schedule your written, hassle free!

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The Federal Aviation Administration recently rolled out a new system to schedule FAA knowledge tests.

Check out our new YouTube video above to learn how to obtain your FTN number and schedule your written, hassle free!

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CFIs: Ask Your Questions! https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/02/12/cfilive/ https://fly8ma.com/blog/2020/02/12/cfilive/#respond Wed, 12 Feb 2020 20:46:37 +0000 https://fly8ma.com/?p=71627 Are you getting ready for your CFI checkride? We are introducing a new CFI LIVE series to help you get the answers you need to be prepared! Be sure to leave your CFI questions in the YT comments for our next CFI Live series video! 

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Are you getting ready for your CFI checkride?

We are introducing a new CFI LIVE series to help you get the answers you need to be prepared!

Be sure to leave your CFI questions in the YT comments for our next CFI Live series video! 

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Converting Your Sport Pilot to a Private Pilot License https://fly8ma.com/blog/2019/10/17/converting-your-sport-pilot-to-a-private-pilot-license/ https://fly8ma.com/blog/2019/10/17/converting-your-sport-pilot-to-a-private-pilot-license/#comments Fri, 18 Oct 2019 02:48:08 +0000 https://www.fly8ma.com/?p=1924 So whether you are currently a Sport Pilot, or simply working towards your sport pilot and decide you want to go for the full private pilot certificate.  The process really is quite simple, and we’ll cover both scenarios for you below. If you are currently a Sport Pilot: Converting a current Sport Pilot certificate to […]

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So whether you are currently a Sport Pilot, or simply working towards your sport pilot and decide you want to go for the full private pilot certificate.  The process really is quite simple, and we’ll cover both scenarios for you below.

If you are currently a Sport Pilot:
Converting a current Sport Pilot certificate to a Private Pilot is fairly easy and will open up a few new doors for you.
Your new privileges will include:
Flying above 10,000′
Flying at night
Flying airplanes with more than 2 seats and more than 1,320lbs.
Flying Faster airplanes
The ability to add a instrument rating
Flying into Class B, C, and D airspace if you are not already  endorsed to do so.
You may find some of the requirements for additional solo flight time and solo cross country time are already met from your regular flying you have done after earning your Sport Pilot certificate.
The additional requirements you will have complete before going for a private pilot checkride include:
Flying 3 hours at night with an instructor
Flying a 100nm+ cross country at night
Making three solo takeoffs and landings at a towered airport
Have at least 5hrs of solo cross country time (greater than 50nm each way with one flight at least 150nm total and including a landing at 3 airports)
If you are in training working towards your Sport Pilot Cert and want to be a Private Pilot
This is certainly the easier and cheaper way to go about pursuing a Private Pilot’s license.  Simply by making the choice before taking the written and checkride for the Sport Pilot it will save you the cost of having to take another checkride and possibly another written exam down the road if you choose to pursue a private pilot’s license after already earning your Sport Pilot cert.
The earlier you make the choice to continue training towards the private pilot license the less time you might waste practicing in an airplane you may ultimately choose to not take your checkride in, however you should know that in most cases you can take your private pilot checkride in the same airplane you started your sport pilot training in (your CFI can answer that specifically for your exact case).
Ultimately to make this switch you will want to sit down with your CFI and take a close look at your logbook and the time you have already logged during training.  I’ll give you an example below of someone who’s already taken 7 lessons towards their sport certificate and decides they would like to pursue a private pilot certificate instead.
Total Time: 9.8 hours
Night Time: 0 hours
Solo: 0 hours
Cross Country Training (Dual) Night: 0 hours
Cross Country Training (Dual) Day: 1.8 hours
Solo Cross Country: 0 hours
Simulated Instrument (hood time): 0 hours
Solo Landings at a Towered Airport: 0
Training (Dual) Landings at Night: 0
What you will need to have to go for the private pilot checkride:
Total Time: 40 hours
Night Time: 3 hours
Solo: 10 hours
Training (Dual) Night: 3 hours
Cross Country Training (Dual) Day: 3 hours
Solo Cross Country: 5 hours
Simulated Instrument (hood time): 3 hours
Solo Landings at a Towered Airport: 3
Training (Dual) Landings at Night: 10
Now even if ou have completed all of your requirements as a Sport Pilot in bare minimum time, and at the last minute decide you want to take a private pilot checkride instead, your comparison chart would look something like this:
Ultimately, whether you choose to make the switch during your sport pilot training or after you have already earned your Sport Pilot certificate, it is not a choice you’ll regret as it will open up quite a few more doors for you and what you will be able to achieve in aviation. If you are at all curios, sit down with your CFI and take a look through your logbook at what else you would need to do to convert to a Private Pilot, or get in touch with one of our CFIs here at FLY8MA to review your logbook with you.
Happy Flying!
-Jon K.

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Why you don’t want to drink the coffee or tea on a plane https://fly8ma.com/blog/2019/10/17/why-you-dont-want-to-drink-the-coffee-or-tea-on-a-plane/ https://fly8ma.com/blog/2019/10/17/why-you-dont-want-to-drink-the-coffee-or-tea-on-a-plane/#comments Fri, 18 Oct 2019 02:20:41 +0000 https://www.fly8ma.com/?p=1915 Now flying on the airlines is stressful enough, and a nice cup of tea or coffee once you sit down on the plane might make you feel better, but this is why you should never EVER drink the coffee or tea on any airliner, anywhere! Let’s start with where the water comes from. It comes […]

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Now flying on the airlines is stressful enough, and a nice cup of tea or coffee once you sit down on the plane might make you feel better, but this is why you should never EVER drink the coffee or tea on any airliner, anywhere!

Let’s start with where the water comes from.
It comes from your regular city water pipes, which depending on what hub you’re in, may or may not be a good thing (probably is a bad thing).  The water is then put into a dirty rusty weird looking truck, unfiltered, and sits in a dirty tank on the truck that is rarely cleaned.
After this truck sits out in the nice warm bacteria loving weather, it will be called over to an aircraft in need of some “potable” water.  The truck then connects a dirty hose that dirt, spilt jet fuel, and spilt blue juice from the lavatories has inevitably gotten into a bit, and proceeds to pump the questionable water from the dirty truck, through the dirty hose, into the very very very dirty water tank of the aircraft in question.  These tanks NEVER get cleaned.  Many of them are in service for years without seeing a bit of a brush and some disinfectant.
Once the questionable so called “potable water” has be pumped into the airplane, it will then be dispensed into a very old and disgusting coffee pot, as either hot water for tea or coffee.  The water being heated helps to dissolve all the other nasty sediment into the water, before it leaves the pipes that have never been cleaned, and into the coffee pot.
Eventually this goo is brought to you, disguised as a dark liquid called coffee (or tea).  Bon appetite.

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Inbound to the lower 48! https://fly8ma.com/blog/2019/04/15/inbound-to-the-lower-48/ https://fly8ma.com/blog/2019/04/15/inbound-to-the-lower-48/#comments Tue, 16 Apr 2019 03:59:36 +0000 https://fly8ma.com/?p=65010 Little Delta makes it into Anacortes, Washington! Even though I have cleared customs in Bellingham (KBLI) several times, there’s always something that goes wrong or a little mistakes are made. This time it was the phone call you have to make at least two hours prior to crossing the border to make sure the customs […]

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Little Delta makes it into Anacortes, Washington!

Even though I have cleared customs in Bellingham (KBLI) several times, there’s always something that goes wrong or a little mistakes are made. This time it was the phone call you have to make at least two hours prior to crossing the border to make sure the customs officers will be there to receive you. Our phones didn’t work in Canada and the customs office claimed to be open til 8pm so I figured we were going to be just fine. We arrived at 4:30 pm but the officers were not happy about the lack of phone call claiming they were about to leave for the day. Oh well, if that’s the worst thing that happened that day we’re doing ok. I also received a phone call from the very nice Australian/Canadian ATC controller who patiently explained my error in filing a composite flight plan when crossing the border. All good lessons to keep learning to make everything run smooth for next time. In conclusion, the best way to file a flight plan is to call the briefer and you can sometimes get your discrete sqwak code over the phone.

 

It just so happened that we arrived in Anacortes at sunset, keeping our reputation of flying at the cusp of darkness every day. Even though Washington is ten degrees latitude south of Anchorage, the days are just as short as we approach the winter solstice. Luckily, the views were beautiful over Bellingham bay and the islands. Over the radio, we connected with Kyle from Adventure Above who was flying around his beautiful custom made Cessna 170B. We landed in Anacortes in the dark, had dinner with Kyle and Samantha at their favorite local burger joint, and made plans for a formation flight the next morning.

The weather was IFR early in the morning over Anacortes but soon the fog burned off and we departed southbound where Kyle would show us his favorite spots. We got the local tour of the islands while playfully flying in formation with our matching airplanes and joking around on the radio. Then we got to Harvey Field, had a bite to eat, and Kyle took us to his favorite gravel bar to land at which reminded me of my beloved Alaska. All in all, it was an epic day.

cessna airplanes

 

We ended up staying in Anacortes for three nights at a beautiful airbnb with some amazing hosts. It has actually been my favorite airbnb so far on this trip (as I am writing this months later). They had bikes for us to borrow and we took them all over town testing out the different dining options. This stay gave us a chance to catch up on some work, edit footage and pictures. I even got to go on a long run through a beautiful trail system called big cedar trail, and I didn’t even have to worry about running right smack into a bear (literally)! We got a chance to do some flight planning for our route to stop at several airport around Washington that were recommended by our viewers. This area was a great stopping point on our journey and off we go southbound to explore some more!

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